Learning Centers

Library

LibraryAn attractive space with soft furniture, beautiful picture books, and writing materials can be an oasis in the classroom-a place to get away from more active interest areas and relax. In the Library Area children develop the motivation and skills necessary to read and write. As they hear stories read aloud every day, look through books on their own, listen to story tapes, retell familiar stories, and make up their own stories, they also have many opportunities to grow in all areas of development.

A. Literacy: An attractive space with soft furniture, beautiful picture books, and writing materials can be an oasis in the classroom-a place to get away from more active interest areas and relax. In the Library Area children develop the motivation and skills necessary to read and write. As they hear stories read aloud every day, look through books on their own, listen to story tapes, retell familiar stories, and make up their own stories, they also have many opportunities to grow in all areas of development.

B. Math: Promote an understanding of measurement by pointing out comparative words in books, such as an “enormous turnip” or a “teeny tiny woman.” Emphasize time concepts by stressing words such as “a long, long time ago,” “tomorrow,” “in a little while,” or “many days later.” A book such as The Tortoise and the Hare will talk about fast, slow, and the passage of time.

C. Science: Encourage children to use informational books in the Library Area to learn more about plants and animals, core topics of life science. You can incorporate all areas of science into a cooking activity after reading Stone Soup. Children learn about healthy foods for the body (life sciences), how to boil water and use kitchen tools (physical science), and about stones (earth and the environment).

D. Social Studies: Promote an understanding of people and how they live by reading stories from other lands or about different occupations. Share books that will help children deal with their feelings and emotions and that show them examples of friendships. Books can help illustrate how people are alike and different. Provide opportunities for children to write a letter or a get-well card or a thank-you note to a parent.

E. The Arts: Nourish a child’s interest in music by reading picture books based on songs such as “This Land Is Your Land” or “Down by the Bay.” Encourage children to explore drama and dance by dramatizing familiar stories.