Learning Centers

Cooking Experiences

Cooking is fun. It’s also a natural laboratory for helping children to develop and learn. When children participate in cooking activities, they learn how food is prepared and how it contributes to their health and well-being. They also form eating patterns that can last a lifetime.

Literacy: Expand children’s knowledge of print and letters and words by developing and using recipe charts and cards and picture cookbooks with children. Point to the words as you read the chart from left to right and top to bottom. Draw children’s attention to the words on food containers and boxes. Offer children alphabet cookie cutters or show them how to form dough in the shape of letters.

Math: Involve children in solving problems about number concepts by posing challenges for them to solve. For example, ask children how they could divide the bowl of dip they made so that everyone in the group can have some. Give children practice in developing one-to-one correspondence by having them set the table for the same number of children as there are chairs at the table.

Science: Involve children in solving problems about number concepts by posing challenges for them to solve. For example, ask children how they could divide the bowl of dip they made so that everyone in the group can have some. Give children practice in developing one-to-one correspondence by having them set the table for the same number of children as there are chairs at the table.

Social Studies: Ask parents to share their family recipes to expose children to people and how they live. Supplement these family treasures with recipes that you have collected reflecting varied cultures and customs, regions of the United States, and climates.

The Arts: Promote drama by pantomiming the movements of various cooking activities such as moving legs like an eggbeater, being a kernel of corn popping, or a piece of bread in a toaster.